Summer delicacy – Boletus Carpaccio

The carpaccio of raw Boletus edulis is a delicacy of the summer time. When you have time to go hiking in the forests, take a look for those great mushrooms. It is a dish which is easy to prepare as entree or a full meal. It is healthy, luxurious and you will love it! Out of season I recommend to use big Champignons, although it is not comparable, but still good!

As promised in my last entry, Treasures of the forest, about my hikes into the forests of the Alps, where we collected dozens of different, delicious mushrooms, I bring up my first recipe. It’s the prime recipe if you have been successful on your hunt for the king of the mushrooms, Boletus edulis (Steinpilz, porcino, cèpe). You could use Champignons as well, the advantage: You don’t have to hike, you can have it all year long!

Boletus edulis the king of all mushrooms which grow above-ground.
Boletus edulis the king of all mushrooms which grow above-ground.

This dish is not comparable to all the other tasty dishes you can prepare when you have been successful, it’s easier to prepare and even more outstanding! The precondition: The mushrooms you use have to be in perfect condition, free of maggots and snails, with hard and fresh flesh. If you have older specimens as well, which are not in perfect condition, remove the sponge-parts and the skin on the cap, slice them thin and put those slices into the oven at around 70°C (160°F) for a couple of hours, while the oven is open a little bit so the humidty can escape. This makes sure all the insects and maggots inhabiting the mushrooms are killed – they crawl outta there and can be removed after the drying process. With the dried Boleti you can prepare Risotto for example, but this is another story…

The main ingredient, Boletus eduli. The older mushrooms can be sliced and dried. The fresh ones (right) can be used for the carpaccio.
The main ingredient, Boletus edulis. The older mushrooms can be sliced and dried. The fresh ones (right) can be used for the carpaccio.
Fine shaved Parmigiano Reggiano is the cheese of choice, but you can also leave it away if you prefer.
Fine shaved Parmigiano Reggiano is the cheese of choice, but you can also leave it away.
Ingredients
The ingredients besides parmesan: fresh black pepper, native olive oil, the mushrooms, sea-salt and sliced parsley (not depicted).

You do not need lots of ingredients, parmesan cheese – which is available under the names Parmigiano Reggiano or Grana Padano – some good native olive oil, half a lemon, parsley, sea-salt and black pepper. The less spice you use, the better you will taste the mushroom itself.

Slice the mushroom exactly like that, slowly and smooth.
Slice the mushroom exactly like that, slowly and smooth.
The marinade looks like that if you did it right. Don't use too much of a single ingredient!
The marinade looks like that if you did it right. Don’t use too much of a single ingredient!

You have to use a sharp knife and slice the mushrooms very thin, not too thin, otherwise the pieces are going to break. In a little glas which can be closed or in Tupperware with a lid, you put 3 – 4 spoons of olive oil, the juice of half a lemon, some sea-salt and a teaspoon of ultrafine chopped parsley – this amount is for one average sized Boletus. Close the lid and shake the glas to obtain a homogenous marinade.

Add all the ingredients, starting with the mushroom slices, layer for layer.
Add all the ingredients, starting with the mushroom slices, layer for layer.

When you have the slices, stratify the mushrooms, add cheese and black pepper, then drip marinade over all of it. Repeat that, as long as you have slices left – layer for layer. Like that the marinade can penetrate equally everywhere. And when you are done with that, leave the plate for about 20 minutes. After that: Enjoy this delicious and luxurious meal!

Boletus carpaccio, a delicacy of the summer, fresh, very tasty, very healthy and luxurious!
Boletus carpaccio, a delicacy of the summer, fresh, very tasty, very healthy and luxurious!

Treasures of the forest – Time for Mushrooms

This is a very short guide to collect mushrooms with some of them depicted. If you want to know more please leave a comment and I will add it to this entry.

Summer in the alps is always time for delicacies. You can go hiking and collect a great variety of mushrooms on your way to sweeten up your cuisine. Yesterday I went together with a friend and what we found, was worth around 30 EUR in raw material. If you calculate the dish in a restaurant, you have quite a little luxurious meal.

Tyrolean Alps

Fliegenpilz 01
Amanita Muscaria, the Fliegenpilz, one of the well reknown but toxic guys you will find on your way
A beautiful pair of Cantharellus cibarius (Pfifferling), one of the most desired mushrooms for the kitchen.
Fliegenpilz 02
Another beautiful Amanita Muscaria, maybe one for the guides to collect mushrooms in its full beauty.
Coral mushroom
A black and white take of those beautiful coral mushrooms, which are not enjoyable to eat, taken with my S3 and the red & yellow filter.
Steinpilz 01
A Boletus Edulis (Steinpilz), king of the mushrooms and ingredient in many luxurious meals of high class restaurants.

The time flies by when you combine the outdoor activity with this tasty hobby and all you need is a little knowledge about where to find those beauties. The Boleti are growing close to the dense forest, where the sun can still reach. Mostly accompanied by Amanita muscaria and sometimes, that was my observation, close to ant nests.You will find some of them even in the dense forest on moss rich areas which are humid. The Cantharellus cibarius – Eierschwammerl (German) – are growing in the moss as well, accompanied by myrtillium vaccinum, the blue berry. You have to lift the moss here and there to find them. It’s easier to find them in dense spruce forests, though. There they grow, well to see, on the ground covered with the spruce leaves, when a sufficient humidity is given. You can just walk by and sometimes cut hands full of it at one place. The Amanita muscaria are not to eat of course, but they are colorful and most beautiful!

Netzstieliger Hexenröhrling
The Boletus luridus is a very good mushroom to eat after you cooked it properly.
Flockenstieliger Hexenröhrling
Boletus erythropus is another representative of the Boletus family, and as luridus toxic if you don’t cook it properly.

Boletus luridus and erythropus are toxic Boleti, if they are not cooked properly. Most people don’t take them, but I do. You have to cut and blanch them, before you roast them in butter, then those species are very tasty, spicy and good to eat! They have a very special taste (awesome) and grow in the same habitant as Boletus edulis, sometimes even on meadows in the mountains, where lots of light comes through. Keep updated, since I will present some recipes the upcoming days for Spätzle with mushroom cream, Pizza with Gorgonzola mushroom topping, and Carpaccio of Boletus edulis.

An entry for toxic mushrooms can be found on the Homepage of the Klinikum Rechts der Isar in Munich (German).